You Can't Touch My Hair

Author: Phoebe Robinson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781913090999

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5941


A hilarious and timely essay collection about race, gender, and pop culture from comedy superstar and 2 Dope Queens podcaster Phoebe Robinson Being a black woman in America means contending with old prejudices and fresh absurdities every day. Comedian Phoebe Robinson has experienced her fair share over the years: she's been unceremoniously relegated to the role of "the black friend," as if she is somehow the authority on all things racial; she's been questioned about her love of U2 and Billy Joel ("isn't that...white people music?"); she's been called "uppity" for having an opinion in the workplace; she's been followed around stores by security guards; and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time. Now, she's ready to take these topics to the page-and she's going to make you laugh as she's doing it. Using her trademark wit alongside pop-culture references galore, Robinson explores everything from why Lisa Bonet is "Queen. Bae. Jesus," to breaking down the terrible nature of casting calls, to giving her less-than-traditional advice to the future female president, and demanding that the NFL clean up its act, all told in the same conversational voice that launched her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, to the top spot on iTunes. As personal as it is political, You Can't Touch My Hair examines our cultural climate and skewers our biases with humor and heart, announcing Robinson as a writer on the rise.

You Can't Touch My Hair

Author: Phoebe Robinson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 014312921X

Category: Humor

Page: 320

View: 6702


A NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLER • “A must-read...Phoebe Robinson discusses race and feminism in such a funny, real, and specific way, it penetrates your brain and stays with you.”—Ilana Glazer, co-creator and co-star of Broad City A hilarious and timely essay collection about race, gender, and pop culture from comedy superstar and 2 Dope Queens podcaster Phoebe Robinson Being a black woman in America means contending with old prejudices and fresh absurdities every day. Comedian Phoebe Robinson has experienced her fair share over the years: she's been unceremoniously relegated to the role of “the black friend,” as if she is somehow the authority on all things racial; she's been questioned about her love of U2 and Billy Joel (“isn’t that...white people music?”); she's been called “uppity” for having an opinion in the workplace; she's been followed around stores by security guards; and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time. Now, she's ready to take these topics to the page—and she’s going to make you laugh as she’s doing it. Using her trademark wit alongside pop-culture references galore, Robinson explores everything from why Lisa Bonet is “Queen. Bae. Jesus,” to breaking down the terrible nature of casting calls, to giving her less-than-traditional advice to the future female president, and demanding that the NFL clean up its act, all told in the same conversational voice that launched her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, to the top spot on iTunes. As personal as it is political, You Can't Touch My Hair examines our cultural climate and skewers our biases with humor and heart, announcing Robinson as a writer on the rise. One of Glamour's “Top 10 Books of 2016”

You Can't Touch My Hair Deluxe

Author: Phoebe Robinson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 073521655X

Category: Humor

Page: 322

View: 4624


The deluxe eBook edition of stand-up comedian and WNYC podcaster Phoebe Robinson’s You Can’t Touch My Hair brings Phoebe’s hilarious voice off the page, directly into your eyes and ears. This enhanced edition features exclusive video footage with cameos by some of Phoebe’s comedy besties, plus more than an hour of audio where Phoebe talks regrettable crushes from the 90s, advice she wishes someone had given her as a teenager, the influence of RuPaul, and much more. Delivered in her signature style, Phoebe serves laughter and levity alongside more serious topics at rapid-fire speeds, topped—as always—with pop culture references for days. A hilarious and timely essay collection about race, gender, and pop culture from upcoming comedy superstar and 2 Dope Queens podcaster Phoebe Robinson Being a black woman in America means contending with old prejudices and fresh absurdities every day. Comedian Phoebe Robinson has experienced her fair share over the years: she's been unceremoniously relegated to the role of "the black friend," as if she is somehow the authority on all things racial; she's been questioned about her love of U2 and Billy Joel ("isn’t that . . . white people music?"); she's been called "uppity" for having an opinion in the workplace; she's been followed around stores by security guards; and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time. Now, she's ready to take these topics to the page—and she’s going to make you laugh as she’s doing it. Using her trademark wit alongside pop-culture references galore, Robinson explores everything from why Lisa Bonet is "Queen. Bae. Jesus," to breaking down the terrible nature of casting calls, to giving her less-than-traditional advice to the future female president, and demanding that the NFL clean up its act, all told in the same conversational voice that launched her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, to the top spot on iTunes. As personal as it is political, You Can't Touch My Hair examines our cultural climate and skewers our biases with humor and heart, announcing Robinson as a writer on the rise.

Prize Stories 1996

Author: William Abrahams

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780385481823

Category: Fiction

Page: 404

View: 6927


For the past three decades, William Abrahams has selected the O. Henry Award winners. Building on a tradition that spans over three quarters of a century, The O. Henry Awards has been "widely regarded as the nation's most prestigious awards for short fiction" (The Atlantic Monthly). Every year, Abrahams has chosen a diverse group of stories and writers to creat a collection that includes perennial favorites as well as an increasing number of lesser known writers, many of whom have gone on to become seminal voices in current American fiction. Prize Stories 1996 is both William Abrahams's thirtieth anniversary as Editor of this landmark collection and his last, which gives this collection a special resonance. The twenty or more stories selected for this honor each yhear are culled from a broad range of American magazines both large and small, offering the reader the full sweep and variety of today's fiction. As in previous years, Prize Stories 1996 concludes with a contributors' notes section including comments by the writers on the inspirations behind their stories, providing readers with a unique entrÚe into the writers' creative processes. Representing the excellence of contemporary fiction writing, these stories demonstrate the continuing strenghth and vitality of the American short story.

The Heavenly Twins

Author: Grand

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 440

View: 1412


Don't Touch My Hair

Author: Emma Dabiri

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 014198628X

Category: Social Science

Page: 0

View: 4188


'Groundbreaking . . . a scintillating, intellectual investigation into black women and the very serious business of our hair, as it pertains to race, gender, social codes, tradition, culture, cosmology, maths, politics, philosophy and history' Bernardine Evaristo, The Times Literary Supplement Books of the Year In this powerful book about why black hair matters, Emma Dabiri takes us from pre-colonial Africa, through the Harlem Renaissance, Black Power and on to today's Natural Hair Movement, the Cultural Appropriation Wars and beyond. We look at everything from hair capitalists like Madam C.J. Walker in the early 1900s to the rise of Shea Moisture today, from women's solidarity and friendship to 'black people time', forgotten African scholars and the dubious provenance of Kim Kardashian's braids. The scope of black hairstyling ranges from pop culture to cosmology, from prehistoric times to the (afro)futuristic. Uncovering sophisticated indigenous mathematical systems in black hairstyles, alongside styles that served as secret intelligence networks leading enslaved Africans to freedom, Don't Touch My Hair proves that far from being only hair, black hairstyling culture can be understood as an allegory for black oppression and, ultimately, liberation. SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2019 IRISH BOOK AWARDS

Arthur's Home Magazine

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7050


National Repository

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 662

View: 4948